Dual or Multiple Exceptionality2021-01-03T20:29:09+00:00

Dual or Multiple Exceptionality

Child in headphones

The term dual or multiple exceptionality (DME) is used in the UK to describe children who have both high learning potential and a special educational need through a learning difficulty or a disability.  Find out what the term dual or multiple exceptionality means, the characteristics of children with dual or multiple exceptionality, common special educational needs which may be linked to DME, the common difficulties such children have and how to support the needs of children with dual or multiple exceptionality at both home and school.

child looking uncertain

Definition of Dual or Multiple Exceptionality

The term dual or multiple exceptionality (DME) is used in the UK to describe children who have both high learning potential and a special educational need because of a learning difficulty or a disability

Discover more about the Definition of Dual or Multiple Exceptionality »

Detail of child's face with a confused look

Characteristics of Children with Dual or Multiple Exceptionality

Children with dual or multiple exceptionality share some characteristics that relate to their intellectual strengths, academic difficulties, and emotional and behavioural characteristics.

See more about the Characteristics of Children with Dual or Multiple Exceptionality  »

Child looking out of the window, with face reflected in the window

Dual Diagnoses in Children with Dual or Multiple Exceptionality

There are several learning differences and disabilities that commonly exist alongside high learning potential.

Find out more about Diagnosed Disabilities and High Learning Potential »

child in headphones looking slightly worried

Common Difficulties for Children with Dual or Multiple Exceptionality

The difficulties that children with dual or multiple exceptionality (DME) face vary according to their additional diagnoses and individual profiles. However, there are some common difficulties such as Executive Function Skill difficulties, Attention Difficulties and Impulsivity, Asynchronous Development, Slow Processing Speed, Poor Handwriting, Sensory Processing Difficulties, Social Problems, Low Self-Esteem, High Emotional Sensitivity.

See more about Common Difficulties for Children with Dual or Multiple Exceptionality »

Young girl on sofa looking at a tablet, wearing headphones

Supporting Children with Dual or Multiple Exceptionality

Children with dual or multiple exceptionality need recognition and support both for their high potential and their difficulty or disability, as supporting one without the other will cause further pressure or frustration.

See more about Supporting Children with Dual or Multiple Exceptionality »

Become a Member

Families benefit from access to our advice line, our electronic resources and our Focus newsletter.

Schools benefit from access to our advice line, online resources and the High Learning Potential Best Practice Award.

Chat with us
Chat with us
Questions, doubts, issues? We're here to help you!
Connecting...
Our chat is open Mon 8-10pm, Wed 9.30am-12pm, Thu 9.30am-12pm & 8-10pm and Fri 9.30am-12pm during term time.
Our operators are busy. Please try again later
:
:
:
Have you got question? Write to us!
:
:
This chat session has ended
Was this conversation useful? Vote this chat session.
Good Bad