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Have you ever considered how laws of physics impact on our daily lives? Have you ever thought about the shapes we see around us in all the objects we use every day? Why are some shapes seen more often than others? Do some have different strengths? What are forces? And why must they be thought about when making a product? What are the different types of motion that make some things move?

We will look at shapes to see which are strong or weak and look at some of the forces that have to be considered when making an object. Then, we will construct some things using different shapes and, by testing them to destruction, discover which shapes are the strongest.

Now to the challenge! Working in teams, you will construct a simple cart or capsule and compete with other teams to see which one can safely carry an egg, without breaking it, over the greatest distance. You might even be daring enough to launch a capsule into the air. But remember you mustn’t break the egg.

When you get home, if your parents agree, you might have a competition with team or local friends to see who can safely carry an egg the furthest.

Philip Callaghan – Wright is the masterclass leader. Philip has taught for over 20 years. His experience includes senior roles in both primary and secondary education within the independent and state sectors, Director of Studies, School Governor, Members of Boards of Education, external examiner and moderator. He is currently a specialist intervention teacher in mathematics and an independent consultant to various education providers. He is an experienced and skilled practitioner in accelerated learning and the development of Gifted and Talented children, together with support for the underachieving pupil. He has previous careers in engineering and contract arbitration. Philip is a Fellow of the RSA and member of various professional bodies associated with education. He is a Freeman of the Worship Company of Educators, London.